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Los Cerritos Wetlands Raptor Ramble Guided Nature Walk

Upcoming Guided Nature Walk

Heron Hike

When: Saturday, November 4th, 2017 from 8:00AM until 10:00AM

Where: Meet in the driveway/parking area at the corner of 1st Street and PCH in Seal Beach. There will be signs. Close-toed shoes required. (Also, good treads on shoes are best after rains.) And kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

Our walk begins with a brief orientation to our wetlands. We will discuss the history and ownership of various parcels within Los Cerritos Wetlands. We will then walk towards the levee and discuss the reintroduction of the tides. After that, using oil roads, we will walk to the old bridge on the levee and discuss the San Gabriel River and the future of bringing water back into the land. Then we will view the City-owned lands, including Marketplace Marsh. After that, we will head back to our meeting place, Bring binoculars, if you have them; we will observe many different kinds of interesting wildlife.

Closed toed shoes are required.

Los Cerritos Wetlands Raptor Ramble Guided Nature Walk

Every dollar counts. Twice!

Los Cerritos Wetlands Gift Match Campaign
Thank you so much to all of our supporters and members that have answered the call for our huge opportunity to match $6,000 in vital funding for wetlands this fall. We're halfway there! Please help us secure every dollar of this gift match pledge and donate today to help us defend, restore, and explore Los Cerritos Wetlands.

We are calling on our friends this fall to join us for a very exciting opportunity. On behalf of the Board of Directors of the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust, a private donor has pledged to match every gift we receive between September 1 and October 31, dollar for dollar, up to $6,000 to directly benefit robust programming in wetlands education, restoration, and protection. We are staggered and humbled by this generosity, and urge you to answer the challenge at whatever level you can, to help us secure every dollar of this promise.

There has never been a more impactful time to become a member, renew your membership, or to make a special tax deductible gift to the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust. We hope you will take advantage of this opportunity to stretch your generosity twice as far, and support local coastal wetlands today!

Long Beach Animal Care Services Hosts Community Seminar on Urban Coyotes.

Long Beach Animal Care Services Hosts Community Seminar on Urban Coyotes.

The Long Beach Department of Parks, Recreation & Marine and Animal Care Services will host a community seminar to educate residents about the urban coyotes of Long Beach.

Speakers will include representatives from Animal Control Services, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and researchers from the Loyola Marymount University Center for Urban Resilience, who are currently conducting a coyote study for the City of Long Beach.

The free seminar will cover several topics, including:

  • Coyote behavior
  • Attractants
  • Deterrent methods
  • Pet safety
  • State response
  • City management plan
  • Details and updates regarding the ongoing coyote study

Coyotes play an important role within the Los Cerritos Wetlands ecosystem where they provide a critical check against invasive species. We want and need coyotes in our local wetlands. However coyotes do not belong in our neighborhoods or within urban areas. Because coyotes are so resilient they are found throughout Long Beach and their behavior impacts all areas of the City. We appreciate that the City of Long Beach is engaging in a fact-based response to our urban coyotes and support working with Loyola Marymount University to conduct a study on the habits of the coyotes in the city. Unbiased and fact-based solutions are the best way to manage urban coyotes. Furthermore this data will assist the City in updating their Coyote Management Plan, and will help with community outreach efforts.

Attend the meeting to learn about the complex issue of urban coyotes and the important role that education plays in learning to co-exist with them.

The City's meeting will be held on Thursday, October 12, 2017, from 6:00 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. at the Wardlow Park Community Center, 3457 Stanbridge Ave, Long Beach 90808.

We support the proposed Polystyrene ban that will be before the City Council on October 17, 2017.

City of Long Beach Polystyrene Ban

Above: A seagull floats amid tons of trash and debris that has piled up near the mouth of the Los Angeles River. (Los Angeles Times)

The City of Long Beach is recommending a ban on polystyrene and we need your support to ensure it becomes law. The item before the City Council is the culmination of 10 months of outreach and dialogue started by Councilmember Lena Gonzalez, Vice Mayor Rex Richardson, Councilmember Jeannine Pearce and Councilmember Roberto Uranga. Expanded Polystyrene (EPS), better known as "Styrofoam", is the second largest source of litter on our beaches and waterways. According to the California Coastal Commission, it takes over 500 years before EPS begins to decompose. As an environmentally responsible coastal city, we cannot allow this dangerous source of litter to pollute our city and waterways anymore. Those opposed to the ban often cite both the recyclability of EPS and the extreme cost to convert to non-EPS products. However, both statements are not true. EPS is one of the least recycled products nationwide, in 2013 the United States EPA reported that less than 2% of all EPS products were successfully recycled. Additionally, as more cities adopt EPS bans, the cost for alternative products have plummeted, now averaging anywhere from cost neutral to two cents cheaper for non-EPS products. This cost can be reduced by upwards of 25% more when businesses use a cooperative purchasing agreement.

SHOW YOUR SUPPORT BY:

1) WRITING YOUR COUNCIL MEMBER. Please show your support for the polystyrene ban by
emailing your City Council member. Let him or her know banning polystyrene is good for the environment and good for the city too!

2) Attend the Long Beach City Council Meeting on Tuesday, October 17th. Please wear GREEN and arrive at 4PM to ensure you get a good seat. City Council chambers are located at 333 West Ocean Blvd, Long Beach 90802. Free Parking is available at the structure located at Broadway and Chestnut.

As we say in our letter of support for the polystyrene ban "In every deliberation, we must consider the impact of our decisions on the next seven generations." -- The Iroquois Confederacy

The proposal to ban polystyrene is in the spirit of the inspiring quote above, and we thank those in Long Beach who are leading with this innovative idea.

Zedler Marsh Trail System Now Open!

Zedler Marsh Trail System, Los Cerritos Wetlands

Experience the first EVER public trail system in Los Cerritos Wetlands. Everyone is welcome.

Upcoming Los Cerritos Wetlands Hike takes place on Saturday, October 7th.

Belding's Savannah Sparrow

Observing Raptors during nature walkEnjoy observing raptors during our October 7th nature walk. It's easy. We will show you how!

 

With summer behind us, I encourage you to get out and enjoy a wonderful nature walk led by our partners, educators associated with the environmental consulting firm, Tidal Influence. They will be leading us on a wonderful hike at the Los Cerritos Wetlands.

Our walk begins with a brief orientation to our wetlands. We will discuss their history-especially the long process to make public the Hellman portion of Los Cerritos Wetlands. We will then walk on the main (oil) road, where we will look for wading birds in the tidal pools on our left. Then we will turn off the main road to view the tidal channel that flows through this section of Los Cerritos Wetlands. Here we will pause to look and listen for Belding's Savannah Sparrows. Then we will mount to the Heron Pointe cultural trail. At the visitor circle we will discuss the native peoples of the area. To return, we usually walk close to Gum Grove Park and look for raptors nesting in the trees. Bring binoculars, if you have them; we will observe many different kinds of interesting wildlife.

Great blue heron on nature walkA great blue heron enjoying our local wetlands. You will likely spot one if you attend our nature walk.

WHAT: Raptor Ramble of the Hellman property at Los Cerritos Wetlands.

WHEN: Saturday, October 7th, at 8:00 am sharp! Parking lot gate will open at 7:45 am and close at 8:10 am. No late-comers can be admitted for the tour, and all participants must stay for the entire tour, which will end by 10:00am.

WHERE: Meet in the driveway/parking area at the corner of 1st Street and PCH in Seal Beach. There will be signs. Close-toed shoes are required and kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult. View map.

RSVP: Email Elizabeth at ejlambe@verizon.net.

September 19: City Council approves new zoning for lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands

City Council approves new zoning for lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands.
Above: New plan for the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands.

New zoning for the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands (known as SEASP) was approved by the City Council Tuesday night. The next step in the process is review by the California Coastal Commission.

As I have mentioned before, there are things we like about the new zoning: it requires bird-friendly design of buildings within the SEASP area; drought tolerant and native plants will be used for landscaping of the new developments; and there is a wetlands mitigation and restoration fund attached to the rezoning that will provide funding for wetlands restoration.

Of the choices suggested by City staff, the City Council picked the "reduced intensity" development. It's still a lot of development, but it could have been worse. We did, and still do, think the now-approved zoning allows buildings that are too high (7 stories in some places!), too much commercial development (an additional 300,000 square feet, we had supported 100,000) and the addition of 2,000 more dwelling units (we had suggested 1,000 more).

However, there were some "constraints" added to the approved development and they are. .. specific areas where a 7 story structure can be located, it must include a hotel and the 7-story portion can take up no more than 15% of the site. It must also have "extraordinary community benefits," like a public plaza or enhanced landscaping. Lastly, the overall number of hotel rooms for the area, 375, remains the same.

Additionally, the City Council is requiring an annual report be produced to inform the community of the number of units proposed vs. number of units actually built.

Developers must meet and confer with the Los Cerritos Wetlands Authority (the agency that manages most of the publicly owned portions of Los Cerritos Wetlands) and also us, the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust, regarding buffers, landscaping, and wetlands for proposed development projects.

The Los Cerritos Wetlands Authority will also play a role in the distribution of funds created by this new wetlands funding program. The actual language, once it is available, will help us figure how much of a win this is, but we appreciate that addition by Councilwoman Suzie Price because it will keep the public in the "planning loop".

With much appreciation to the many people who took time out of their lives to attend SEASP planning meetings, attend workshops, and communicate with their elected officials their vision for the future of South East Long Beach, we want to emphasize that your vision and staunch advocacy for our community and our local wetlands has and does make all the difference.

September 19: SEASP City Council Meeting. We encourage your attendance to speak up for the future of Los Cerritos Wetlands.

The final plan for the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands will be before the City Council.The final plan for the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands will be before the City Council this Tuesday. Please attend and share your views.

 

The City's final vote on the proposed development and conservation plan for the lands in and around
Los Cerritos Wetlands (known as SEASP, the South East Area Specific Plan) is Tuesday September 19th. It is the culmination of years of hearings, surveys, and community debate. The proposed plan, while improved by the Planning Commission, still has significant flaws that must be fixed before it goes any further.

Things we like that have been added to the plan include:

Native and drought tolerant landscaping, including a plant palette recommended by the Los Cerritos Land Trust, have been added.

A development and mitigation fund that would fund wetlands restoration is now a part of the proposed plan.

Audubon-Society-suggested bird-safe building measures are now included.

All of that is good. It really is. But development allowed under the current proposal will still be too dense for the limited development sites: the buildings are too high, putting bird safety at risk; the buffers between development and wetlands are too small, and public access plans for the area are uncertain.

Not to mention that the benefits for our community, as a result of approving this amount of new development, need to be more specific, including clear rules concerning wetlands and public open space protections.

To make the plan better and gain our approval, the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust supports a few essential modifications to the proposed SEASP:

      • Further reduced density in the form of an "interim baseline cap" (and requiring additional traffic and other analyses and increased community benefits before that "cap" can be increased). The interim baseline cap would be the capacity of total allowable net new density and intensity for the SEASP area unless and until the General Plan process provides additional information, analysis and support for more development in the SEASP area. Specifically that means within the updated SEASP we could support the approval of 2,191,746 total square foot of retail space (which is 100,000 square feet over existing). 375 total hotel rooms (same as existing allowing for redevelopment of these rooms) and 5,079 total housing units, which is an increase of 1,000 over what currently exists). That seems like the right amount for such an important and sensitive area for now.
      • Lower building height limits, especially near sensitive wetlands and in flyway areas. Lower building heights are essential for bird safety in this important flyway between the ocean, Alamitos Bay and sensitive wetlands. The most essential and feasible mitigation to protect birds in the SEASP Area are lower building heights. Therefore, buildings above five-stories should be prohibited in the SEASP area and buildings adjacent to wetlands should not exceed 3 stories in height. Buildings within SEASP, must demonstrate that they do not interfere with - and ideally enhance - views of coastal resources, including the water, wetlands and natural areas and landforms. Buffer areas abutting wetlands must be robust and based on science.
      • Buffers on properties adjacent to wetlands must be a minimum of 100 feet in width, with buffers to remain as natural areas. Passive recreational uses, including bird watching, walking, jogging, and bike riding could be permitted beyond the 100-foot setback along the edge of parking or structures, but not within the wetlands buffers themselves. Public open space must be accessible and fully integrated into any new development. Usable open space within the new SEASP areas needs be a minimum of 20% of a development site and defined as "publicly usable open space." Therefore it should not include areas inaccessible to the public such as courtyards, balconies, decks, indoor gyms, and patios.
      • Furthermore, as new development is permitted, it should incorporate open space set aside for public access, not just to the wetlands but to the marina and Alamitos Bay also, creating an integrated system of walking, biking, and hiking routes and staging areas.

It's a lot to take in, I know. But it's important that the City get this right, and we are trying to do our part. Working with impressive experts we have come to the position above with a great deal of research and thought and we are now sharing our views with the City in the form of our final comprehensive comment letter to help improve the proposed update.

I invite you to check it out and then, please, if you care about Los Cerritos Wetlands and the local community, attend this Tuesday's City Council meeting and speak in favor of the above provisions.

What: City Council meeting to discuss and vote on final proposal regarding the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands.

When: Tuesday, September 19th, 2017 at 5:00PM (but get there whenever you can.)

Where: Long Beach City Council Chambers, 333 West Ocean Blvd. Long Beach, CA 90802

Why: Because this is our best chance to get the right plan for our local community and local wetlands.

For more information or to rsvp, send an email to: elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org.

September 19: City Council approves new zoning for lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands

City Council approves new zoning for lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands.
Above: New plan for the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands.

New zoning for the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands (known as SEASP) was approved by the City Council Tuesday night. The next step in the process is review by the California Coastal Commission.

As I have mentioned before, there are things we like about the new zoning: it requires bird-friendly design of buildings within the SEASP area; drought tolerant and native plants will be used for landscaping of the new developments; and there is a wetlands mitigation and restoration fund attached to the rezoning that will provide funding for wetlands restoration.

Of the choices suggested by City staff, the City Council picked the "reduced intensity" development. It's still a lot of development, but it could have been worse. We did, and still do, think the now-approved zoning allows buildings that are too high (7 stories in some places!), too much commercial development (an additional 300,000 square feet, we had supported 100,000) and the addition of 2,000 more dwelling units (we had suggested 1,000 more).

However, there were some "constraints" added to the approved development and they are. .. specific areas where a 7 story structure can be located, it must include a hotel and the 7-story portion can take up no more than 15% of the site. It must also have "extraordinary community benefits," like a public plaza or enhanced landscaping. Lastly, the overall number of hotel rooms for the area, 375, remains the same.

Additionally, the City Council is requiring an annual report be produced to inform the community of the number of units proposed vs. number of units actually built.

Developers must meet and confer with the Los Cerritos Wetlands Authority (the agency that manages most of the publicly owned portions of Los Cerritos Wetlands) and also us, the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust, regarding buffers, landscaping, and wetlands for proposed development projects.

The Los Cerritos Wetlands Authority will also play a role in the distribution of funds created by this new wetlands funding program. The actual language, once it is available, will help us figure how much of a win this is, but we appreciate that addition by Councilwoman Suzie Price because it will keep the public in the "planning loop".

With much appreciation to the many people who took time out of their lives to attend SEASP planning meetings, attend workshops, and communicate with their elected officials their vision for the future of South East Long Beach, we want to emphasize that your vision and staunch advocacy for our community and our local wetlands has and does make all the difference.

September 19: SEASP City Council Meeting. We encourage your attendance to speak up for the future of Los Cerritos Wetlands. Thank you!

The final plan for the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands will be before the City Council.The final plan for the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands will be before the City Council this Tuesday. Please attend and share your views.

 

The City's final vote on the proposed development and conservation plan for the lands in and around
Los Cerritos Wetlands (known as SEASP, the South East Area Specific Plan) is Tuesday September 19th. It is the culmination of years of hearings, surveys, and community debate. The proposed plan, while improved by the Planning Commission, still has significant flaws that must be fixed before it goes any further.

Things we like that have been added to the plan include:

Native and drought tolerant landscaping, including a plant palette recommended by the Los Cerritos Land Trust, have been added.

A development and mitigation fund that would fund wetlands restoration is now a part of the proposed plan.

Audubon-Society-suggested bird-safe building measures are now included.

All of that is good. It really is. But development allowed under the current proposal will still be too dense for the limited development sites: the buildings are too high, putting bird safety at risk; the buffers between development and wetlands are too small, and public access plans for the area are uncertain.

Not to mention that the benefits for our community, as a result of approving this amount of new development, need to be more specific, including clear rules concerning wetlands and public open space protections.

To make the plan better and gain our approval, the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust supports a few essential modifications to the proposed SEASP:

      • Further reduced density in the form of an "interim baseline cap" (and requiring additional traffic and other analyses and increased community benefits before that "cap" can be increased). The interim baseline cap would be the capacity of total allowable net new density and intensity for the SEASP area unless and until the General Plan process provides additional information, analysis and support for more development in the SEASP area. Specifically that means within the updated SEASP we could support the approval of 2,191,746 total square foot of retail space (which is 100,000 square feet over existing). 375 total hotel rooms (same as existing allowing for redevelopment of these rooms) and 5,079 total housing units, which is an increase of 1,000 over what currently exists). That seems like the right amount for such an important and sensitive area for now.
      • Lower building height limits, especially near sensitive wetlands and in flyway areas. Lower building heights are essential for bird safety in this important flyway between the ocean, Alamitos Bay and sensitive wetlands. The most essential and feasible mitigation to protect birds in the SEASP Area are lower building heights. Therefore, buildings above five-stories should be prohibited in the SEASP area and buildings adjacent to wetlands should not exceed 3 stories in height. Buildings within SEASP, must demonstrate that they do not interfere with - and ideally enhance - views of coastal resources, including the water, wetlands and natural areas and landforms. Buffer areas abutting wetlands must be robust and based on science.
      • Buffers on properties adjacent to wetlands must be a minimum of 100 feet in width, with buffers to remain as natural areas. Passive recreational uses, including bird watching, walking, jogging, and bike riding could be permitted beyond the 100-foot setback along the edge of parking or structures, but not within the wetlands buffers themselves. Public open space must be accessible and fully integrated into any new development. Usable open space within the new SEASP areas needs be a minimum of 20% of a development site and defined as "publicly usable open space." Therefore it should not include areas inaccessible to the public such as courtyards, balconies, decks, indoor gyms, and patios.
      • Furthermore, as new development is permitted, it should incorporate open space set aside for public access, not just to the wetlands but to the marina and Alamitos Bay also, creating an integrated system of walking, biking, and hiking routes and staging areas.

It's a lot to take in, I know. But it's important that the City get this right, and we are trying to do our part. Working with impressive experts we have come to the position above with a great deal of research and thought and we are now sharing our views with the City in the form of our final comprehensive comment letter to help improve the proposed update.

I invite you to check it out and then, please, if you care about Los Cerritos Wetlands and the local community, attend this Tuesday's City Council meeting and speak in favor of the above provisions.

What: City Council meeting to discuss and vote on final proposal regarding the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands.

When: Tuesday, September 19th, 2017 at 5:00PM (but get there whenever you can.)

Where: Long Beach City Council Chambers, 333 West Ocean Blvd. Long Beach, CA 90802

Why: Because this is our best chance to get the right plan for our local community and local wetlands.

For more information or to rsvp, send an email to: elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org.

September 16 at 9am: Coastal Cleanup Day!

Save Our Beach: Coastal Cleanup Day

You are invited to be a part of Coastal Beach Cleanup Day, California's largest annual volunteer event! Spend a few hours helping at a local beach cleanup in Seal Beach/Long Beach hosted by our friends at Save Our Beach.

When: Saturday, September 16th, 2017, from 9:00am-12:00pm

Where: (3 locations!)
(1) 15 1st Street: meet at 1st Street parking lot in Seal Beach
(2) Seal Beach Pier: Ocean and Main Street, Seal Beach, CA 90740
*parking permits will be provided for both Seal Beach parking lot locations.
(3) Across the river on the Long Beach jetty side near entrance to Ballast Point Brewery: park in Alamitos Bay parking lot NORTH of the Crab Pot restaurant.

There will be a VANS shoe certificate giveaway!

Save Our Beach at 1st Street location will be selling men's and women's t-shirts and hats for $10 each, cash only please.

Summer wetlands field trips for kids were such a success, we want to do more!

Admiral Kidd Park kids on wetlands field trip

Admiral Kidd Park kids on nature walk


The summer of 2017 marks our first official partnership with the City of Long Beach's BeSAFE (Summer Activities in a Friendly Environment) program. BeSAFE is a Department of Parks, Recreation, and Marine (PRM) program through which several park sites keep their doors open longer to provide a safe and fun environment for local residents. This year, PRM expanded their BeSAFE programming to 11 sites. The Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust had previously provided field trips for a handful of sites, but this year 30-40 kids from each BeSAFE park site were transported to Los Cerritos Wetlands in order to take part in a 90-minute hike, which ended with a light meal and educational activity at Heron Pointe cultural mitigation location. Along the walk kids engaged in numerous fun activities, including tracking exercises and the very popular use of binoculars to observe flora and fauna.

Our recent summertime BeSAFE Field Trip Program is the start of what will be a significant expansion of our community education programs. In the fall, plans are underway to utilize a California Coastal Conservancy "Explore the Coast" grant to bring 3rd grade classes from 15 local Long Beach schools to the wetlands. This fall field trip program will utilize the Zedler Marsh area and its outdoor classroom facilities. A special curriculum, titled "Estuary Explorers", will be brought to life by our partners, Tidal Influence.

We are excited to be expanding our wetlands educational programing and see it as an enormous community benefit. Often school-aged children have a limited understanding of local ecosystems and the concept of watersheds. Therefore the proximity of Los Cerritos Wetlands provides a unique opportunity to educate young students about coastal habitats right in their backyard! One of our primary goals is to create an appreciation and understanding of wetlands to help inspire future stewards of the environment.

In addition to wetlands field trips provided through grants, trips can be arranged for community groups and schools. The two types of field trips provide two different but equally valuable experiences. Our original educational program (originating at the Hellman property) provides a nature walk with immersive activities. The Zedler Marsh trip showcases a different part of the wetlands and is more of an outdoor classroom experience. Both types of field trips are available for a fee for clubs, community groups, and schools beyond our grant-funded programs. If you are interested in further information about our community and educational wetlands field trip program I urge you to contact the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust's field trip coordinator, Bridget Sramek, at bridgetsramek@gmail.com.

September 2: Observe the amazing sea turtles of the San Gabriel River.

A Pacific Green Sea Turtle Chelonia mydas agassizii - Endangered Species	Video of our local sea turtles provided by the Aquarium of the Pacific. See them for yourself on Saturday, September 2nd.


On Saturday, September 2nd, you are invited to join us for a free 2-hour guided wetlands nature walk, led by naturalists from the environmental consulting group Tidal Influence. We will look for wildlife sightings, learn about our rich ecosystems, reflect on history, and see current restoration activities.

Our walk begins with a brief orientation to our wetlands. We will discuss their history and see an important portion of them, including the Pumpkin Patch property, as we walk along the San Gabriel River to view the sea turtles. On our return, we will stop at Zedler Marsh, where there is a nursery for wetlands plants and where restoration is in process. We will then walk on the levee back to our meeting place. Bring binoculars, if you have them; besides the turtles, we will observe many different kinds of interesting wildlife.

Meet and park in the driveway at the intersection of 1st street and PCH in Seal Beach. Our walk starts at 8:00 a.m., and the parking lot gate closes at 8:15 a.m. No latecomers can be admitted. Events are family friendly, but strollers are not permitted, and all particpants need to be able to walk a couple of miles (slowly) without having to turn back. Close-toed shoes are required, and please bring sunscreen and water. Rain cancels. For more information or to rsvp, email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org

After our nature walk, you are invited to join in and help the community-based restoration of Los Cerritos Wetlands, which takes place from 10:30 am -12:30 pm the first Saturday of every month. Participants are eligible to win prizes such as a T-shirt or tickets to the Aquarium of the Pacific. Meet at the same place we meet for our nature walks.

For more information or to RSVP, email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org

August 5: Join us for our wetlands nature walk!

You will likely see an egret hanging out at Los Cerritos Wetlands at our nature walk.You will likely see an egret hanging out at Los Cerritos Wetlands at our nature walk on Saturday, August 5th.

Photo: Arthur Bohlmann

Check out this interesting freshwater marsh habitat during our upcoming nature walk.Check out this interesting freshwater marsh habitat during our upcoming nature walk.


Join our fun Los Cerritos Wetlands nature walk of Marketplace Marsh on Saturday, August 5th.

Marketplace Marsh is an amazing watery feature of Los Cerritos Wetlands. Check it out for yourself. Given that it's summertime, there may not be much water within the marsh, but there are sure to be lots of interesting plants and animals to learn about along the way. We will likely come across great blue herons, as well as egrets and other water-loving wildlife.

Our tour is led by our partners, biologists and environmental educators from Tidal Influence, who will lead us on a walking tour that will take us to Marketplace Marsh on the City of Long Beach's wetlands parcel and over to the San Gabriel River on property held by the Los Cerritos Wetlands Authority.

During this 2-mile urban hike, you will learn about the history of land acquisitions in Los Cerritos Wetlands, and leaders will show us some freshwater marsh habitats that few people have ever viewed. Participants will get a behind-the-scenes look at how wetlands and oil operations co-exist at Los Cerritos Wetlands.

WHAT: Nature walk of the Marketplace Marsh at Los Cerritos Wetlands.

WHEN: Saturday, August 5th, 2017, at 8:00AM. Parking lot gate will open at 7:45AM and close at 8:10AM. No late-comers can be admitted for the tour, and all participants must stay for the entire tour, which will end by 10:00AM.

WHERE: Meet in the driveway/parking area at the corner of 1st Street and PCH in Seal Beach. There will be signs. Close-toed shoes are required, and kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

For more information or to RSVP, email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org

Updating of the plan for the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands is moving forward. There have been some improvements, but not enough.

A plan that updates the Southeast area of Long Beach (SEASP) is a good idea, but only if it sufficiently takes into account the fragility and value of Los Cerritos Wetlands.A plan that updates the Southeast area of Long Beach (SEASP) is a good idea, but only if it sufficiently takes into account the fragility and value of Los Cerritos Wetlands.


We have said it before and we will say it again. A plan that updates the Southeast area of Long Beach (SEASP) is a good idea, but only if it sufficiently takes into account the fragility and value of Los Cerritos Wetlands.
And while there have been some improvements to the proposed updated plan, there need to be more.

What do we want? We want an updated plan that protects the centerpiece of the area, and SEADIP Planning. that is Los Cerritos Wetlands. The public wants that too. At every single SEASP updating outreach meeting, the attendees said again and again how much they value Los Cerritos Wetlands and see it as an important and enduring natural and community resource. As the process moves forward, we continue to be in contact with the City and have consistently communicated our views to them. Our finaI EIR comment letter, submitted prior to the SEASP Planning Commission meeting, is the latest example of our committment to providing substantive input to the updating process.

At this point the proposed updated plan has been approved by the Planning Commission, and the next stop will be at the City Council. We still think the plan allows buildings that are too tall, there is not enough buffer area between the wetlands and proposed development, and environmental protections like bird-safe lighting need to be stronger.

But, as with everything, there are some things we like in the proposed plan. We like the wetlands conservation and mitigation fund, which would be connected to the amount of development allowed in the area. And while it is clear to us that a seven-story building is not necessary to the success of the SEASP area, we are glad the Planning Commission at least required it be moved across PCH from Los Cerritos Wetlands.

Further environmental concerns remain. Tall buildings located within corridors used by migrating birds and fellow avians travelling between the wetlands and Alamitos Bay could weaken species already combating the pressures of the urban landscape that surrounds Los Cerritos Wetlands. Traffic impacts would remain significant and unavoidable, thereby increasing development pressure on the wetlands. To mitigate these impacts, we are researching the incorporation of a baseline allocation land use policy, as used in Santa Monica and Livermore, among other cities. Such a policy would set a baseline allocation for the amount of allowed development and provide for "extra" development intensity (up to a cap) for projects that provide additional community benefits like wetlands enhancement or viewing areas, sustainable building practices, sustainable energy sources, and so forth. We are planning on hosting a community meeting on the topic to share this idea with the community and hear back what you think. So stay tuned for further details. In the meantime I encourge you to share your thoughts and views with us and, of course, with your local Councilmember. Review by the City Council is the next step in this process.

We support the move to ban polystyrene within Long Beach. It's bad for Los Cerritos Wetlands and bad for people too.

The ubiquitous but harmful styrofoam container.The ubiquitous but harmful styrofoam container.

The City of Long Beach is looking at banning the use of polystyrene, which is most frequently found in take-out containers or thick stryrofoam drink cups.

Polystyrene lasts a really long time, breaks down into super small pieces that fragile species can mistake as food, and clutters up our local beaches and wetlands. It is a threat to Los Cerritos Wetlands, which is why we support the City's effort to eliminate this undeniably harmful product. And we say so in our letter of support to the City. To learn more about the proposed ban, check out these articles in the Long Beach Press Telegram and the Long Beach Post. Both feature comments from our friend and collegue, Katie Allen, Executive Director of the Algalita Foundation, another Long Beach based organization doing great work researching and publicizing the impacts of plastics in our ocean and on the earth.

June 3 at 8am: Mark your calendars for our next nature walk - a great way to get to know Los Cerritos Wetlands!

A Pacific Green Sea Turtle Chelonia mydas agassizii - Endangered Species	A Pacific green sea turtle enjoying Los Cerritos Wetlands' San Gabriel River.


On Saturday, June 3rd, you are invited to join us for a free 2-hour guided wetlands nature walk, led by naturalists from the environmental consulting group Tidal Influence
.

We will look for wildlife sightings, learn about our rich ecosystems, reflect on history and see current restoration activities.

Our walk begins with a brief orientation to our wetlands. We will discuss their history and see an important portion of them, including the Pumpkin Patch property, as we walk along the San Gabriel River to view the sea turtles. On our return, we will stop at Zedler Marsh, where there is a nursery for wetlands plants and where restoration is in process. We will then walk on the levee back to our meeting place. Bring binoculars, if you have them; besides the turtles, we will observe many different kinds of interesting wildlife.

Meet and park in the driveway at the intersection of 1st street and PCH in Seal Beach. Our walk starts at 8:00 a. m. and the parking lot gate closes at 8:15 a. m. No latecomers can be admitted. Events are family friendly but strollers are not permitted. Close-toed shoes are required, and please bring sunscreen and water. Rain cancels. For more information or to rsvp, email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org

After our nature walk, you are invited to join in and help the community-based restoration of Los Cerritos Wetlands which takes place from 10:30 am -12:30 pm the first Saturday of every month. Participants are eligible to win prizes such as a T-shirt or tickets to the Aquarium of the Pacific. Meet at the same place we meet for our nature walks. For further information about how to volunteer for the wetlands restoration activity email iwanttohelp@tidalinfluence.com

June 3 at 11am: Paddle Out for Clean Waves!

A Pacific Green Sea Turtle Chelonia mydas agassizii - Endangered Species

Surfrider Foundation has done some great work helping to educate the public about the value of cleaner water in the San Pedro Bay. Looks as if taking down the breakwater (in a sensible way, that respects property) could be one way to improve water quality, the marine environment and bring some waves back to Long Beach. And cleaner ocean water means cleaner water coming into Los Cerritos Wetlands.

I urge you to take some time this Saturday, June 3rd at 11:00AM to join us at the Surfrider "Paddle Out in Memory of the Waves" event. Meet at the Granda Launch Ramp area near Rosie's Dog Beach. We will have our Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust information table at the event where we will be educating event goers about the connection between clean water in San Pedro Bay and a cleaner Los Cerritos Wetlands.

Supported by Assembly member Patrick O'Donnell, who is also a long time advocate for Los Cerritos Wetlands, this event is a fun and easy way to show your support for bringing cleaner water back to Long Beach. Hope to see you there!

For further details check out the Surfrider's Breakwater Awareness Month facebook page.

And of course, Saturday is also the date of our monthly wetlands nature walk. Our always popular Turtle Trek will be the focus of this Saturday's walk. Did you know there are sea turtles who reside in the San Gabriel River near Los Cerritos Wetlands? The walk takes about two hours and we meet at 8:00AM in the driveway at the corner of 1st Street an PCH in Seal Beach. It's a super fun walk and we hope to see you there! Closed toe shoes required!

June 1 at 5pm: Attend Long Beach Planning Commission vote regarding the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands

A Pacific Green Sea Turtle Chelonia mydas agassizii - Endangered Species	The lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands are about to be rezoned.

On Thursday, June 1st, 2017, the Long Beach Planning Commission will vote on the now completed Southeast Area Specific Plan (SEASP).

I urge you to attend the meeting which will be at the Long Beach City Hall. It starts at 5:00 PM, but get there whenever you can.

For those of you who have been following this process, the City of Long Beach has been working towards updating the zoning for the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands, hence SEASP. The Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust, in the interest of protecting our local wetlands, has been involved in the updating process at every level. We have reviewed and commented on all the reports and documents and had many meetings with the City. We are pleased that the City has taken many of our comments seriously and are appreciative of the dialog we have had about several issues, including:

  • Seaport Marina Hotel A revised andwetlands friendly plant palette for the area,
  • Lower building heights where buildings are adjacent to the wetlands, and the flexibility to adjust heights at time of project design to further avoid impacting wetlands,
  • Road relocation in order to avoid impacting the fragile Los Cerritos Wetlands,
  • Building design requirements for safe bird passage.
  • Establishment of a Wetland Conservation and Monitoring Fund to provide for both wetlands restoration and long-term management within the SEASP plan,
  • A study as a basis for requiring development impact fees that would fund both wetlands restoration and ongoing maintenance as the SEASP is implemented.

These proposed changes to the SEASP will help address the otherwise significant impacts substantial new development allowed by the plan would have on the wetlands.

However, to ensure the wetlands are better protected, we urge the Planning Commission to adopt the following proposals so that the otherwise significant impacts of proposed development will be more fully mitigated.

  1. The Planning Commission and City must clarify the circumstances under which a development project could be streamlined under the Program Environmental Impact Report (EIR) and SEASP.
  2. The City must require additional environmental review for projects under SEASP that seek maximum height and bulk and minimum setbacks and parking and transportation improvements. And under no circumstances is a 7 story building appropriate within the SEASP area.
  3. Because the SEASP is not a detailed development and design plan, and its EIR is a Program EIR, additional review on a project-by-project basis will be necessary to address otherwise unforeseen or inadequately analyzed environmental impacts.
  4. Both the Wetlands Conservation and Monitoring Fund Study, as well as establishment of a transportation management organization, (to ensure transportation improvements are funded) must be completed prior to implementing the SEASP plan or any planned development.
  5. As SEASP is built out and taller buildings replace existing buildings, flight patterns of birds moving between Alamitos Bay and the wetlands may shift. Therefore, bird movement studies should be incorporated into future project-specific reviews. Furthermore the proposed "Lights out for Birds" program should be mandatory, not voluntary.
  6. The Financial Feasibility Study conducted for SEASP, which underlies the assumptions used in crafting the plan, must be updated. It is well to remember that the 2nd+PCH project, currently under or close to construction, relies on the much lower permitted heights and densities of the current zoning yet expects to be profitable.
  7. We remain concerned that SEASP permits human uses such as trails to be constructed within wetland buffers and think that aspect of the proposed plan should be changed.
    SEADIP Planning.

Seaport Marina HotelLastly we are intrigued by an innovative way to address the additional burden that more intense development will place on the community...."a baseline land use allocation policy". It's something that other cities, Santa Monica for example, do to manage growth and density by creating additional opportunities for mitigation. As we learn more details we will be sure to share them with you and with the City of Long Beach.

After all, according to the City of Long Beach, the new plan will "transform mobility in this section of the City, update buildings with new mixed-use opportunities to shop, eat, live and enjoy, and provide a new funding source for the area's wetlands in the form of a new wetland conservation and monitoring fund."

Let's make sure we get a plan that is good for the wetlands AND the surrounding community.

Hope to see you on Thursday, June 1st at the Planning Commission meeting.

Sincerely,
Elizabeth Lambe,
Executive Director
Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

P.S. Make sure you check out the staff report and accompanying memo on the proposed SEASP update for details about what will be discussed on Thursday evening.

May 18: Planning Commission study session for the Southeast Area Specific Plan (SEASP) impact on the lands in and around Los Cerritos Wetlands

Seaport Marina HotelThe Seaport Marina Hotel is going away.  Attend the Planning Commission study session on Thursday to learn details about what might replace it.

The corner of 2nd Street and Pacific Coast Highway, located directly across from Los Cerritos Wetlands, was at one point the site of a great and popular Long Beach hotel, the Seaport Marina. Sadly the hotel has fallen into disrepair, and there has been one project after another proposed for that corner.

Some of you might remember the second and PCH proposal from a few years ago that included a 12-story tower. 12 stories! Can you imagine how that would impede the birds that travel to and from Alamitos Bay and Los Cerritos Wetlands? The other thing we were worried about at the time was that, if approved, such an out-of-proportion project for the area would set off an out-of-control tall building spree in the area, a disaster for the wetlands. Thankfully that project was defeated, and now there is a new project proposed for that corner. We don't know too much about it yet other than it does indeed conform with existing zoning, or at least we think it does.

According to the City's website, the proposed project involves demolition of the existing Seaport Marina Hotel and construction of a commercial center totaling 245,000 square feet, consisting of 95,000 square feet of retail uses, a 55,000-square-foot grocery store, a 25,000-square-foot fitness/health club, approximately 70,000 square feet of restaurant uses, and 1,150 parking spaces. The proposed commercial structures would be one- and two-story buildings with a maximum height of 35 feet as defined by the Long Beach Municipal Code.

We are eager to learn more, and we hope you are too. That's why I am attending the Planning Commission study session about the the new 2nd and PCH proposal this Thursday, at 5:00PM at City Council Chambers. I hope you will also attend to learn about such a large undertaking, and also let's hope there will be details presented at the meeting. In our role as "watchdogs for the wetlands" we plan to thoroughly review and comment on the Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) for the project. We will look at all of it through the lens of how it will impact the fragile plants and animals that rely on Los Cerritos Wetlands. A concern, always, is the issue of traffic because the more traffic in the area, the more there are calls to put roads through our fragile local wetlands; and that is something we, the Los Cerritos Wetlands, would never allow to happen.

P.S. For a trip down memory lane regarding the Seaport Marina hotel check out Tim Grobaty's article in the Press-Telegram. The Seaport Marina has an amazing history, and it is worth remembering it's important role in Long Beach's coming of age.

We love all the love that the Colorado Lagoon has been receiving lately.

Colorado Lagoon Restoration Grand Opening Celebration

At one time the Colorado Lagoon and Los Cerritos Wetlands were together, part of a vast wetlands complex that spread for miles from the ocean inland via the San Gabriel River. However, over the years the area was filled in for development and infrastructure, and now just small patches of wetlands remain. The larger patch is Los Cerritos Wetlands, on it's way to being rehabilitated and restored. A smaller, but also very important patch is the Colorado Lagoon; and although it too was left to degrade and deteriorate, just like Los Cerritos Wetlands, the actions of determined and visionary local activists turned its fate around.

Thanks to advocacy coupled with modern technology, the water quality in the Lagoon is better than ever; and the Lagoon restoration project has brought back native plants, restored the bridge that traverses the Lagoon, removed concrete, created attractive meandering paths, and introduced eelgrass to the northern arm.

It is all very exciting, and the grand re-opening of this restored waterway is in just a few days. I encourage you to attend the opening and celebrate this community and natural success story. Details are below.

I'll be there with family and friends and hope you will too!

Colorado Lagoon Restoration Grand Opening Celebration

April 30: Screening of Tending The Wild at historic Art Theatre.

Screening of Tending The Wild at historic Art Theatre.The Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust is a co-host of the Long Beach Indigenous Solidarity Network's special screening of "Tending The Wild," which will be followed by a discussion with local Southern California indigenous community members on Sunday, April 30th, 2017, at the Art Theatre Long Beach (10am).

"Tending the Wild" shines light on the environmental knowledge of Southern California's indigenous peoples by exploring how indigenous traditional knowledge and practices can teach a new generation ways to restore our environment.

This documentary, produced by KCET and the Autry Museum, examines how it is necessary for humans to live in balance with nature and how traditional practices can inspire a new generation of Californians to tend their environment.

Doors open at 10am.
Opening words at 10:45am
Screening begins promptly at 11am. Speakers/Discussion to follow after film.

The post screening discussion will be with Cultural Educators Craig Torres (Tongva Nation), and Heidi Lucero (Acjachemen/Ohlone Nations). Tongva people were early inhabitors of Los Cerritos Wetlands. The discussion will be moderated by Larry Smith, host of American Indian Airwaves on KPFK 90.7 FM in Los Angeles

$10 presale tickets; $15 at the door.
Proceeds will directly support our guest speakers and the venue for the film screening.

April 29: Join the People's Climate March


I urge you to join the People's Climate March on Saturday, April 29th at 11:00AM at Banning Park in Wilmington. I'll be there, marching with my family, because climate change is one of the most important environmental issues facing humankind. We all must do what we can to protect our planet and future generations from this potential environmental catastrophe. The video below really inspired me to attend. I hope it will inspire you too!

May 7: Springtime Kayaking within Los Cerritos Wetlands

Kayaking trip to Steamshovel SloughJoin us for a refreshing kayaking trip to Steamshovel Slough, an amazing watery portion of Los Cerritos Wetlands. Steamshovel Slough is one of the most pristine salt marshes in all of Southern California and will give you a glimpse of what Los Cerritos Wetlands will look like once it is restored.

These kayaking trips are 2 miles out and 2 miles back through much of southeast Long Beach. You will learn about the history of the land and these waterways, as well as about two other amazing wetlands sites currently being restored.

Rules for kayaking: You must be able to swim. You must be in decent shape to handle 4 miles - 3 hours of kayaking (with a few breaks). It is recommended that you have been kayaking before, but novice kayakers are welcome to join us, with the request that they show up at 8:30am for a brief kayaking lesson. Wear proper attire for kayaking; you will get splashed (no jeans and tennis shoes).

Logistics: Meet at Leeway Sailing Center at 9:00am (8:30am for newbies). We will have you back by 12pm. Cost is $20, covering the cost of the kayak, paddle, and life-vest rental. Your leaders will be naturalists from our partners at Tidal Influence, who have been running these kayak tours for over 4 years.

You must reserve a spot by sending an e-mail to elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org to be able to attend the kayaking trip. We recommend reserving spots soon, as they often fill up fast. For the trip to go forward we need at least 5 people to sign up. So if you are interested, please sign up as soon as possible.

May 6: Wetlands Nature Walk

Egret hanging out at Los Cerritos Wetlands on nature walkYou will likely see an egret hanging out at Los Cerritos Wetlands at our nature walk on Saturday, May 6th. photo: Arthur Bohlmann, https://artmannphoto.smugmug.com/

 

You will likely see an egret hanging out at Los Cerritos Wetlands at our nature walk on Saturday, May 6th. photo: Arthur Bohlmann, https://artmannphoto.smugmug.com/
Join our fun Los Cerritos Wetlands nature walk of Marketplace Marsh on Saturday, May 6th.

Marketplace Marsh is likely to be full of water after our recent rainy winter. Check it out for yourself! After all, it's springtime, and there are sure to be lots of interesting plants and animals to learn about along the way.

Our tour is led by our partners, biologists and environmental educators from Tidal Influence, who will lead us on a walking tour that will take us to Marketplace Marsh on the City of Long Beach's wetlands parcel and over to the San Gabriel River on property held by the Los Cerritos Wetlands Authority.

We will likely come across great blue herons, as well as egrets and other water-loving wildlife.

Freshwater marsh habitatCheck out this interesting freshwater marsh habitat during our upcoming nature walk.

During this 2-mile urban hike, you will learn about the history of land acquisitions in Los Cerritos Wetlands, and leaders will show us some freshwater marsh habitats that few people have ever viewed. Participants will get a behind-the-scenes look at how wetlands and oil operations co-exist at Los Cerritos Wetlands.

WHAT: Nature walk of the Marketplace Marsh at Los Cerritos Wetlands.

WHEN: Saturday, May 6th, 2017 at 8:00AM. Parking lot gate will open at 7:45AM and close at 8:10AM. No late-comers can be admitted for the tour, and all participants must stay for the entire tour, which will end by 10:00AM

WHERE: Meet in the driveway/parking area at the corner of 1st Street and PCH in Seal Beach. There will be signs. Close-toed shoes are required, and kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

For more information or to rsvp, email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org

April 22: The Green Prize Earth Day Festival.

The Green Prize FestivalLong Beach, CA
The Green Prize Festival is Long Beach's biggest Earth Day event, and we are proud to be a part of it. On April 22nd from 11AM to 6PM at Houghton Park, there will be eco-friendly food booths, great music, and plenty of local non- profits and governmental agencies with tips about how to live a greener, more sustainable lifestyle. At the Green Prize Festival you will learn what the important environmental issues are in Long Beach and how you can get involved, as well as check out the results of a home brew competition. Sounds interesting, important, and fun, don't you think? We, the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust will be there, and we need volunteers on that day. Can you help? Not only will you learn the latest news regarding Los Cerritos Wetlands, but you will get to meet, up close and personal, people, like you yourself, who are interested in what we can do locally to protect the environment. Click here to send an email to volunteer for Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust at the Green Prize Festival.

There will be live entertainment, educational workshops, demonstrations, and guest speakers.

More information can be found on the Green Prize Festival Facebook page.

Tending The Wild Special Screening Tending The Wild examines how it is necessary for humans to live in balance with nature and how traditional practices can inspire a new generation of Californians to tend their environment.

The Long Beach Indigenous Solidarity Network will present a special screening of Tending The Wild followed by a discussion with local Southern California Indigenous community members at 10:00AM on Sunday, April 30th at the Art Theatre in Long Beach.

Produced by KCET, Tending The Wild shines light on the environmental knowledge of indigenous peoples across California by exploring how they have actively shaped and tended the land for millennia, in the process developing a deep understanding of plant and animal life.

 

 

 

April 20: Wetlands Mitigation Bank Study Session

Wetlands Mitigation Bank Study Session

Satellite image above shows a site plan of the oil operator's oil field and "mitigation bank" in green. The parcels owned by Lyon Communities and by the Los Cerritos Wetlands Authority, including the "Pumpkin Patch" site, are in yellow.  The yellow-colored sites are where most of Synergy's oil wells are proposed to be consolidated.

Beach Oil Mineral Partners, the folks proposing a mitigation bank on portions of Los Cerritos Wetlands, will be presenting their proposal at an upcoming Planning Commission meeting on Thursday, April 20th, 2017. The meeting starts at 5:00PM and will be held in the City Council Chambers.

According to the City of Long Beach's Planning Commission meeting notice, they will "conduct a study session regarding the Los Cerritos Wetlands Restoration and Oil Consolidation Project proposed by Beach Oil Minerals Partners, LLC."

For those of you who haven't heard about this proposal, wetlands land owners, Synergy Oil and Lyon Communities are proposing to remove and consolidate existing oil facilities onto some smaller portions of Los Cerritos Wetlands marked as LCWA Site and Pumpkin Patch on the above map. According to project proponents there would be a substantial reduction in the oil production footprint as well as wetlands and habitat restoration. The Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust has not yet taken a position on the project but we appreciate the landowners keeping us apprised of the latest details and are looking forward to learning more at the upcoming Planning Commission study session.

April 1 & 9: Wetlands nature walk & kayak trip

Beldings Savannah Sparrow

Our next wetlands nature walk will be on Saturday, April 1st. Thanks to the recent winter and spring rains our wetlands landscape will look especially verdant and lush. Our walk will focus on the many raptors that depend on Los Cerritos Wetlands and their place in the wetlands ecosystem. Walk attendees will stroll through heritage coastal sage scrub and historic dredge spoils, while looking for birds of prey and other species that nest in the area. As we pass the salt flats, we may see tiger beetles and coyote tracks before hiking up to the Heron Pointe Cultural trail to discuss how tidal circulation shapes our local wetlands, as well as learn about the first people to inhabit Los Cerritos Wetlands and how the wetlands shaped their culture and lives.

We will complete our walk by heading back along the access to the parking. Bring binoculars, if you have them; we will observe many different kinds of interesting wildlife.

WHAT: Raptor Ramble on the Hellman Portion of Los Cerritos Wetlands.

WHEN: Saturday, April 1st, 2017, at 8:00 am sharp! Parking lot gate will open at 7:45 am and close at 8:10 am. No late-comers can be admitted for the tour, and all participants must stay for the entire tour, which will end by 10:00 am.

WHERE: Meet in the driveway/parking area at the corner of 1st Street and PCH in Seal Beach. There will be signs. Close-toed shoes required. Kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

RSVP: Email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org

Kayaking trip to Steamshovel Slough
Our next kayak trip to Los Cerritos Wetlands will be on Sunday, April 9th. Come join us for a refreshing kayaking trip to Steamshovel Slough, an amazing watery portion of Los Cerritos Wetlands. Steamshovel Slough is one of the most pristine salt marshes in all of Southern California and will give you a glimpse of what Los Cerritos Wetlands will look like once it is restored. These kayaking trips are 2 miles out and 2 miles back through much of southeast Long Beach. You will learn about the history of the land and waterways, as well as about two other amazing wetlands sites currently being restored.

Rules for kayaking:

  • You must be able to swim.
  • You must be in decent shape to handle 4 miles - 3 hours of kayaking (with a few breaks).
  • It is recommended that you have been kayaking before, but novice kayakers are welcome to join us, with the request that they show up at 8:30am for a brief kayaking lesson.
  • Wear proper attire for kayaking; you will get splashed (no jeans and tennis shoes).


Upcoming springtime wetlands kayaking trips are scheduled for:

March 12, April 9, May 7, 2017.

We will be hosting additional kayak trips in the summer and early fall.

You must reserve a spot by sending an e-mail to elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org to be able to attend a kayaking trip. We recommend reserving spots soon, as they often fill up fast. And for the trip to go forward we need at least 5 people to sign up. So if you are interested, please sign up as soon as possible.

Logistics:

  • Meet at Leeway Sailing Center at 9am (8:30am for newbies). We will have you back by 12pm.
  • Cost is $20, covering the cost of the kayak, paddle, and life-vest rental.
  • Your leaders will be naturalists from our partners at Tidal Influence, who have been running these kayak tours for over 4 years.

RSVP soon to reserve your spot by e-mailing elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org

Latest news on the AES Conversion

New AES power plant is not needed and will unnecessarily harm Los Cerritos Wetlands.

We have some good news regarding the proposed conversion of the AES powerplant. That news is that the Stanford Law School Environmental Clinic is now representing us before the California Energy Commission. They took our case because of their focus on protecting the environment and the importance of enforcing California's laws to mitigate climate change.

Other good news is that our list of allies continues to grow and includes such important organizations as the Sierra Club and Heal the Bay. They wrote a great letter opposing new gas-fired generators in Alamitos (Long Beach) and Huntington Beach. As you know, the old power plants on these sites were built in coastal wetlands filled by past generations before we knew the irreplaceable value of these ecologically sensitive areas. Both those facilities are unnecessarily oversized for grid reliability, with the California Energy Commission poised to approve 1040 megawatts of gas-fired generation at Alamitos (about 60% larger than the California Public Utilities Commission - CPUC - approved) and 840 megawatts at Huntington Beach (about 30% larger than what the CPUC approved). Combined, this is 50% more than even what the CPUC found necessary.

The Los Angeles Times recently published a really good overview about the history and reason for the overbuilding of power plants in California. To quote from the article. . . ."California has a big - and growing - glut of power, an investigation by the Los Angeles Times has found. The state's power plants are on track to be able to produce at least 21% more electricity than it needs by 2020, based on official estimates. And that doesn't even count the soaring production of electricity by rooftop solar panels that has added to the surplus. To cover the expense of new plants whose power isn't needed. . . .Californians are paying a higher premium to switch on lights or turn on electric stoves. In recent years, the gap between what Californians pay versus the rest of the country has nearly doubled to about 50%"

So not only is the proposed conversion of AES bad for the wetlands but it is bad for ratepayers too!

We who live in California take pride in our laws and policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to combat global warming. And of course, we are busy planning adaptation strategies for the impacts from inevitable climate change. And coastal wetlands restoration will be a critical element for protecting natural resources and our coastal communities from more intense flooding, pollution, habitat loss and other threats from global warming and sea level rise.

Both of the AES projects, here and in Huntington Beach, contradict California's efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change.

Now is the time to ensure that California's claims of progressive actions to address climate change are actually implemented! We cannot push this off to the next generation.

Bad news, however, is that the preliminary decision, by the presiding member of the California Energy Commission is largly in favor of the AES powerplant conversion. What is most puzzling to us, something we are still scratching our heads over, is why the CPUC and now CEC wants to allow AES to approve even more gas fired, climate change producing energy production than even AES says is necessary. You can read that preliminary decision here.

We continue on. After all, the future of the wetlands and the future of the earth's climate depends on moving away from dirty energy.

March 30 at 7pm: LCWLT Annual Meeting

CSULB Professor Lily House Peters CSULB Professor Lily House Peters will talk about climate resiliency.


Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust is pleased to invite you to a special community presentation on Thursday evening, March 30th, for an informative and engaging discussion about local climate resiliency efforts. The presentation features two speakers.

Professor Lily House Peters will brief us about the big picture overview of climate resilience, what it means, and its role in reducing vulnerability to climate change impacts. Lily House Peters is Assistant Professor of Sustainability Science, Department of Geography, California State University, Long Beach, and the 2016 Resilience Commitment Coordinator & Chair of the Resilience Working Group for CSULB's Office of Campus Planning and Sustainability.

Patricia Chen is one of two co-organizers of Long Beach 350.org. 350.org is building a global grassroots movement to solve the climate crisis. Their online campaigns, grassroots organizing, and public actions are led from the bottom up by thousands of volunteer organizers in over 188 countries. Patricia will share with us what 350. org is doing locally to help Long Beach prepare for the impacts of climate change. Find out what your city leaders are doing about climate change and how you can work with them to do more.

Patricia Chen from Long Beach 350 will talk about local efforts to combat climate change.Patricia Chen from Long Beach 350 will talk about local efforts to combat climate change.

In addition to this presentation, we will also be using this occasion to conduct our Annual Board of Directors Election, with four of our sitting directors seeking renewed terms. Before the workshop begins, each of our board candidates will take a moment to speak with us about their commitment to Los Cerritos Wetlands, and members eligible to vote can cast ballots.

We hope you will join us for this engaging presentation.

Hope to see you there!

Elizabeth Lambe
Executive Director
Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust

WHAT: Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust Board of Directors Election and Annual Members Meeting.

WHEN: Thursday, March 30 at 7:00pm.

WHERE: Kettering Elementary School Auditorium,
550 Silvera Ave, Long Beach, CA 90803

For more information or to RSVP email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org

March 22: Aquarium of the Pacific event, featuring Professor Christine Whitcraft

CSULB Professor Christine Whitcraft talk about the value of salt marsh wetlands, the threats they face and what you can do to help defend them.Whitcraft is an associate professor in the biology department at California State University, Long Beach and president of Friends of Colorado Lagoon.


If you have a chance, I urge you to come and hear President of the Friends of Colorado Lagoon and CSULB Professor Christine Whitcraft talk about the value of salt marsh wetlands, the threats they face and what you can do to help defend them.

According to the Aquarium of the Pacific "Salt marshes, a type of wetland, are highly productive and important ecosystems along our coast. Human activities, such as development and pollution, have reduced and degraded wetland areas. Here in California, we estimate that approximately 90 percent of our coastal wetlands have been lost. Despite habitat restorations, climate change predictions indicate that sea level rise and increasing temperatures will have a profound impact on these coastal salt marshes.

Christine Whitcraft will discuss how human activities, including development and climate change, impact salt marshes and how we can successfully protect and restore these valuable ecosystems in the future."

Not only is Professor Whitman a well regarded expert on the topic of wetlands but she has great way of making complicated subject matter interesting and easy to understand. Hope you get a chance to hear her. Details about the event are below.

WHEN: Wednesday, March 22nd, 7:00 PM-8:30 PM

WHERE: Aquarium of the Pacific, 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach, CA 90802

ADMISSION: $5 for public; FREE for Aquarium members, seniors age 62 and up, teachers, and students with valid ID and advanced reservations.

TICKETS: You can purchase tickets online for this lecture. You will need to select the option from the menu, correct time, and date on the following pages. Seniors age 62 and up, teachers, and students attending for free can also reserve seats online.

For more information or to RSVP email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org

March 4: Join us on a fun and inspirational nature walk. We will be checking out the amazing sea turtles of the San Gabriel River.

Video of our local sea turtles provided by the Aquarium of the Pacific.
See them for yourself on Saturday, March 4th.

On Saturday, March 4th, you are invited to join us for a free 2-hour guided wetlands nature walk, led by naturalists from the environmental consulting group Tidal Influence. We will look for wildlife sightings, learn about our rich ecosystems, reflect on history and see current restoration activities.

Our walk begins with a brief orientation to our wetlands. We will discuss their history and see an important portion of them, including the Pumpkin Patch property, as we walk along the San Gabriel River to view the sea turtles. On our return, we will stop at Zedler Marsh, where there is a nursery for wetlands plants and where restoration is in process. We will then walk on the levee back to our meeting place. Bring binoculars, if you have them; besides the turtles, we will observe many different kinds of interesting wildlife.

Meet and park in the driveway at the intersection of 1st street and PCH in Seal Beach. Our walk starts at 8:00 a.m. and the parking lot gate closes at 8:15 a.m. No latecomers can be admitted. Events are family friendly but strollers are not permitted. Close-toed shoes are required, and please bring sunscreen and water. Rain Cancels.

For more information or to rsvp, email elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org

After our nature walk, you are invited to join in and help the community-based restoration of Los Cerritos Wetlands which takes place from 10:30 am -12:30 pm the first Saturday of every month. Participants are eligible to win prizes such as a T-shirt or tickets to the Aquarium of the Pacific. Meet at the same place we meet for our nature walks.

March 12, April 9 and May 7, 2017:
Wetlands Kayak Tours

Kayaking trip to Steamshovel Slough
Join us for a refreshing kayaking trip to Steamshovel Slough, an amazing watery portion of Los Cerritos Wetlands. Steamshovel Slough is one of the most pristine salt marshes in all of Southern California and will give you a glimpse of what Los Cerritos Wetlands will look like once it is restored. These kayaking trips are 2 miles out and 2 miles back through much of southeast Long Beach. You will learn about the history of the land and these waterways, as well as two other amazing wetlands sites currently being restored.

Kayaking trip to Steamshovel SloughRules for kayaking:

  • You must be able to swim.
  • You must be in decent shape to handle 4 miles - 3 hours of kayaking (with a few breaks).
  • It is recommended that you have been kayaking before, but novice kayakers are welcome to join us, with the request that they show up at 8:30am for a brief kayaking lesson.
  • Wear proper attire for kayaking; you will get splashed (no jeans and tennis shoes).


Upcoming springtime wetlands kayaking trips are scheduled for:

March 12, April 9, May 7, 2017

We will be hosting additional kayak trips in the summer and early fall.

You must reserve a spot by sending an e-mail to elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org to be able to attend a kayaking trip.

We recommend reserving spots soon, as they often fill up fast. And for the trip to go forward we need at least 5 people to sign up. So if you are interested, please sign up as soon as possible.

Logistics:

  • Meet at Leeway Sailing Center at 9am (8:30am for newbies). We will have you back by 12pm.
  • Cost is $20, covering the cost of the kayak, paddle, and life-vest rental.
  • Your leaders will be naturalists from our partners at Tidal Influence, who have been running these kayak tours for over 4 years.

March 1: Tell the California Energy Commission AES is not needed and will harm Los Cerritos Wetlands.

Tell the Commission the proposed new AES power plant is not needed and will unnecessarily harm Los Cerritos Wetlands. Emission of fine particulate dust from the proposed AES facility could adversely impact the health of wetlands vegetation and water quality, and poses an unnecessary health risk to the surrounding community.

The California Energy Commission is coming to Long Beach.

Please join representatives of the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust, and tell the Commission the proposed new AES power plant is not needed and will unnecessarily harm Los Cerritos Wetlands.

WHAT: California Energy Commission Committee Meeting on Proposed Decision.

WHEN: Wednesday, March 1, 2017, beginning at 11am. Public Comment begins at 12pm.

WHERE: Grand Events Center, 4101 E. Willow Street (near the Lakewood Blvd. intersection)

I urge you to attend the meeting and let the California Energy Commission know how you feel about a large and unnecessarily damaging project so close to Los Cerritos Wetlands. Like everyone, we support a modernized energy system that ensures reliable electrical service. But we oppose the California Energy Commission licensing AES's proposed 1040 megawatt (MW) gas-fired facility adjacent to Los Cerritos Wetlands. We think there are more economic and environmentally superior alternatives, like the 300 MW battery storage facility AES is also proposing. This and other modern alternatives are the future of reliable electricity in California.

Additionally, the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) recently allowed a maximum of 640MW of gas-fired generation at this site. That decision by the CPUC ensured grid reliability in the region, and enforced California's laws to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Approving 1040MW, as the Energy Commission is poised to do at AES Alamitos, would be inconsistent with California's laws to reduce GHG emissions. It would also create unnecessary adverse impacts to the wetlands and the surrounding community from excess air emissions, noise, dust, etc. A smaller AES plant means less impact to the wetlands and our community.

The CPUC found that renewable sources of energy may have reduced the need for 640 MW of gas-fired generation at Alamitos. But they ultimately decided that it was "reasonable" for Southern California Edison to choose a fossil fuel burning option over cleaner alternatives. We continue to believe that the CPUC should have insisted on more preferred resources like improved efficiency, renewable generation and battery storage. But the CPUC made it perfectly clear that any more capacity in the region must come from those preferred resources--which means 640MW at Alamitos is the maximum gas-fired generation allowed.

The license to build the AES plant currently proposed should be denied by the Energy Commission. It is too large and inconsistent with state laws enacted to mitigate climate change, and it will cause unnecessary harm to the wetlands and our community.

Our position is sound public policy and consistent with California law. We hope you agree and will make your point of view known. I'll be at the CEC meeting and hope you can join me. This Energy Commission decision will either reverse past mistakes to dredge and fill rare coastal wetlands or continue those past mistakes into our children's lifetime!

Thank you for supporting our mission to protect and restore Los Cerritos Wetlands.

P.S. If you can't attend in-person, you can follow the hearing, in real time, on your computer. Click here for instructions provided by the CEC.

We are mourning the passing of one of Los Cerritos Wetlands' greatest friends.

Volunteers at Zedler Marsh Clean UpAnn tabling at Los Cerritos Wetlands with a fellow volunteer. Ann always made a point of wearing her blue Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust t-shirt whenever she tabled.


When those who envisioned Los Cerritos Wetlands as a wonderful natural and community resource first gathered to discuss how to protect this fragile area, there were very few who thought of wetlands as more than a bunch of scrubby weeds, a good spot perhaps to construct houses, strips malls and the like.

It took people with vision, fortitude and willingness to work hard to help the public understand how important it was to protect Los Cerritos Wetlands from exploitation and development; and Ann Denison was one of those people. Ever optimistic, Ann never lost faith that if she just "kept at it," someday her vision of a protected Los Cerritos Wetlands would be realized. And while Ann served a lot of important roles within the Land Trust, I will remember most her passion and committment to the pubic outreach that has grown this organization so much over the years. Ann just knew that if she could talk to enough people one-on-one, they would share her vision of a protected and restored Los Cerritos Wetlands and would want to help. And you know, she was right.

Kayaking trip to Steamshovel SloughAnn made sure all who stopped by the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust information table signed up to hear from us about important upcoming wetlands related events.

Over the years Ann coordinated and ran our extensive tabling operations that ensured we were at every public event possible. Armed with Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust brochures, maps and a sign up-sheet, Ann would talk to anyone who cared to listen about the importance of protecting Los Cerritos Wetlands, encouraging each person who stopped to become a member and to sign up to get our informational emails. Ann, with her perfectly manicured nails, would grab a passer-by (at the local farmers market or at an Earth Day event, for examples) and ask them her standard question, "Have you heard about Los Cerritos Wetlands?" In those early days most people would say no. Ann would explain where the wetlands were located and why they were important to preserve. She would sign up members right there on the spot and invite them on one of our fun nature walks. I remember Ann's optimism as she would tell people that she never expected in her lifetime to see any of the wetlands securely protected and yet here we are in 2017 with over half of Los Cerritos Wetlands in the public trust. Even as others were doubtful, Ann knew that with grit and determination, we would win the battle of protection over exploitation of our local wetlands, and she was right.

Ann was an avid traveler and made it to many remarkable places over her lifetime. She passed away last week after completing one of her "bucket list" trips, and that was to the nation of Cuba. Ann's husband Jim, who was truly her partner in life and biggest fan, passed away exactly three years to the day and hour before Ann did, and I can imagine them together again in heaven looking down on us. I can imagine Ann telling me not to be sad, that there is no time to be sad, since tabling at Sunday's Southeast Farmers Market is less than a week away, and we need to ensure our information table will be in place.

Good bye Ann Denison, my friend and inspiration. I will miss you, and speaking on behalf of all of us who love nature and animals as much as you did, my heart goes out to your family and friends ... especially to your beloved son Steve.

P.S. Thanks LBRport.com for the lovely article that summarized all of Ann's many contributions to the parks and open spaces of Long Beach over the years.

February 19: Sustainable Sunday Cinema featuring the award winning film, DAMNATION.

DamNation Free Screening at Art Theater of Long Beach

This powerful film odyssey across America explores the sea change in our national attitude from pride in big dams as engineering wonders to the growing awareness that our own future is bound to the life and health of our rivers. DamNation's majestic cinematography and unexpected discoveries move through rivers and landscapes altered by dams, but also through a metamorphosis in values, from conquest of the natural world to knowing ourselves as part of nature.

The Santa Barbara Independent says......."DAMNATION IS A MOVIE THAT MATTERS...WITH A BLEND OF HISTORY, FACE-MELTING NATURE CINEMATOGRAPHY, AND A DASH OF EDWARD ABBEY-STYLE CRIMINAL MISCHIEF, DAMNATION LAYS BARE THIS TRUTH IN A WAY THAT IS EDUCATIONAL, ENTERTAINING, AND, PERHAPS MOST IMPORTANTLY, INSPIRATIONAL."

Please join the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust and our co-sponsors on Sunday, February 19th at Long Beach's historic Art Theatre for a screening of the critically acclaimed film DamNation, with a talk to follow. Doors open at 10AM, but come early to chat with local environmental groups and enjoy free popcorn courtesy of the Art Theater, Long Beach. $2 mimosas will be available for sale thanks to Art Du Vin and 4th Street Vine.

Our co-sponsoring organizations, Sierra Club, Surfrider Foundation, Green Long Beach, 350.org and Friends of the Colorado Lagoon will be there with information tables so you can get up to date on what the local activist community is doing to improve the environment of Long Beach and beyond.

What: Screening of an award winning documentary, DamNation

When: Sunday, February 19th, 2017 at 11:00AM. Doors open at 10:00AM; come early to mingle with local environmental groups.

Where: The Art Theatre of Long Beach, 2025 East 4th St., Long Beach, CA 90814

Who: Special Guest Speaker Candice Meneghin, Conservation Manager, California Trout.
After the screening, attendees are invited to stay and hear from about the effort to ensure there will be resilient populations of wild fish thriving in the healthy rivers of Southern California, including our own San Gabriel River.

For more information or to rsvp, email Elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org

You won't want to miss this movie. Buy your ticket today!

February 4: Thanks to recent rains our February wetlands nature walk will be fresh and green!

Los Cerritos Wetlands' Marketplace Marsh

The Marketplace Marsh is an amazing feature of Los Cerritos Wetlands that is usually hidden from view. It is sure to be full of water due to recent rains. Your best chance to check out this unique resource is on Saturday, February 4th.

On Saturday, February 4th, biologists and environmental educators from Tidal Influence will lead participants on an inspiring nature walk at Los Cerritos Wetlands. Expert guides will lead walk attendees on a tour that will take them to Marketplace Marsh on the City of Long Beach's wetlands parcel and then over to the San Gabriel River to property held by the Los Cerritos Wetlands Authority. You will likely come across great blue herons, which measure up to 4 feet tall. Their wing spans are huge, 5.5 to 6.5 feet.

During this 2-mile urban hike, you will learn about the history of land acquisitions in Los Cerritos Wetlands, and leaders will show us some freshwater marsh habitats that few people have ever viewed. Participants will get a behind-the-scenes look at how wetlands and oil operations co-exist at Los Cerritos Wetlands.

WHAT: Heron Hike of the Marketplace Marsh at Los Cerritos Wetlands.

WHEN: Saturday, February 4th, at 8:00AM. Parking lot gate will open at 7:45AM and close at 8:10AM. No late-comers can be admitted for the tour, and all participants must stay for the entire tour, which will end by 10:00AM

WHERE: Meet in the driveway/parking area at the corner of 1st Street and PCH in Seal Beach. There will be directional signs. Close-toed shoes are required, and kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

RSVP: elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org

P.S. Directly after our nature walk, you can volunteer to help restore Los Cerritos Wetlands. The volunteer wetlands restoration activities are from 10:30AM until 12:30PM. If you have a couple of hours to help with wetlands restoration, please send an email to iwanttohelp@tidalinfluence. No experience is required, and our wetlands will benefit from your service.

Here's to hope and determination in 2017

Support Los Cerritos Wetlands Trust

As an organization, the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust has come a long way from that first group of citizens who gathered in someone's living room to begin the conversation of how they, ordinary people, could work together to advocate for the protection and preservation of rapidly vanishing coastal wetlands. Fast forward to today, when almost half of Los Cerritos Wetlands are safely in the public's hands, and the conversation is more and more about how best to restore and rehabilitate them.

That is good news, and it is important to take the time to celebrate it.

Of course there is bad news these days, too, and much of it is emanating from Washington D.C. These are dark times for those of us who care about our nation's parks, wilderness areas, and open spaces. I worry about their safety and their future. However, much can be done to protect the environment at the local level, and with your help, we are persevering here in our cities, where it will be more important than ever to emerge as leaders in climate science and conservation. Despite the risk of regressive environmental policies at the federal level, we are excited about progress to come at the local level, with plans to move even more of Los Cerritos Wetlands into the public trust, new and innovative ways for the public to experience our wetlands, as well as expanding outdoor education for local school children in 2017. We're also proud that our city just recently took the first step towards banning styrofoam, keeping harmful pollution out of our fragile coastal ecosystems. These are the local victories that will uplift and sustain us during these challenging times.

The fight to protect and restore Los Cerritos Wetlands will continue into the new year and beyond. We are so grateful in the knowledge that we have the partnership and support of our members to prevail. I urge you to affirm or renew your commitment to the restoration, exploration, and defense of Los Cerritos Wetlands by making a tax deductible donation to the Land Trust today. In doing so, you empower this organization to remain vigilant in the face of ever-evolving obstacles, as well as contribute to a legacy which we are determined to preserve for future generations.

We hope you have a happy holiday season and are able to spend time with family and friends. With appreciation for your support and vision of a fully restored Los Cerritos Wetlands!

Join us on a fun nature walk. The wetlands will be fresh and green, as they once were and will be again.

Raptor Ramble Nature Walk in the WetlandsA great way to celebrate the holiday season is to get out and enjoy the outdoors. Join us and our partners, educators from the biological consulting company, Tidal Influence, on a wonderful hike at Los Cerritos Wetlands on Saturday, January 7th.

Our walk begins with a brief orientation to our wetlands. We will discuss their history- especially the long process to make public the Hellman portion. We will then walk on the main (oil) road, where we will look for wading birds in the tidal pools on our left. Then we will turn off the main road to view the tidal channel that flows through this section of Los Cerritos Wetlands. Here we will pause to look and listen for rare Belding's Savannah Sparrows. Then we will mount the Heron Pointe cultural trail. At the visitor circle we will discuss the native peoples of the area. To return, we usually walk close to Gum Grove Park and look for raptors nesting in the trees. Bring binoculars, if you have them; we will observe many different kinds of interesting wildlife.

WHAT: Raptor Ramble at Los Cerritos Wetlands

WHEN: Saturday, January 7th, at 8:00 am sharp! Parking lot gate will open at 7:45 am and close at 8:10 am. No late-comers can be admitted for the tour, and all participants must stay for the entire tour, which will end by 10:00 am.

WHERE: Meet in the driveway/parking area at the corner of 1st Street and PCH in Seal Beach. There will be signs. Close-toed shoes required; and kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

RSVP:
Email Elizabeth at elizabeth@lcwlandtrust.org.

For more information and a map of where we meeting please download this hike flyer.